Tag Archives: The Wagon Magazine

The Great Wen

The September issue of Chennai’s literary journal, The Wagon Magazine is now available online.

There’s something a little sad learning about recently passed away poets, but this issue includes some of the work of three such people: Bart Wolffe, H G Razool and Cynthia Jobin. I was unfamiliar the first two poet’s work, but the poetry quoted is interesting, and I particularly enjoyed reading about Razool, a brave and peaceful man, by the sounds of it. Cynthia’s work I know well, being a regular visitor to her website, as she was to mine before her passing ten months ago. She was a greatly talented poet and a fine conversationalist…

Jobin and Wolffe’s work is mentioned by Wagon regular John Looker in connection with the recently published anthology ‘Indra’s Net,’ from the independent publisher Bennison Books: some of their poetry, and some of John’s is included in this anthology. There is also a guest article by the publisher, Deborah Bennison. I plan to write a review of the book on this website in the not-too distant future.

The September issue also includes a dedication to the Indian songwriter Dr Bhupen Hazarika, and the usual mix of contemporary poetry and fiction. Oh – and my own column, The Wanderer, which this issue looks at those poets and writers who have found England’s great capital not so much to their tastes, starting with William Cobbett, who christened it “The Great Wen”.

On my other website, Andy Fleck’s Blog, I have recently been writing a little about the historical associations of England’s most popular names, and about one of the greatest of English kings you might never have heard of, Athelstan – grandson of Alfred the Great. Coming up, a look at the popular novel and TV series, The Last Kingdom – set during Alfred’s reign.

 

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Lust in the Holy Land

July’s issue of the Wagon is available online now and highly readable. Please take a look here:

My own column looks at the figures of David, Solomon in modern poetry and the influence of Song of Songs. I know from my stats on WordPress that people like reading about smutty poems… so, please, have a read.

The July issue also contains some interesting poetry from the Chinese poet Hongri Yuan, among others; while John Looker’s Letter from London, comes this week from Dunedin in New Zealand, which is near enough – it includes an excellent recent poem of his.

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I’ve been posting a bit at Andy Fleck’s Blog recently. A little side interest of mine last year, was where in history George R.R. Martin got his ideas from for his popular Game of Thrones novels. I wrote a couple of articles about it back then, but I’m only now getting around to posting them to tie in with the latest series. Not everyone’s cup of dragon’s blood, I expect, but possibly interesting for some.

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The Wanderer

The Wagon Magazine is a literary journal, published out of Chennai in India, dedicated to seeking out new and lesser known literary talent from the subcontinent and around the world.

Since last month, the magazine has been publishing a monthly column by yours truly, titled The Wanderer. Each column, I look at five or six extracts from poems on a particular theme, or featuring a particular motif or idea. I wanted to do something different from the articles here on Sweettenorbull, where generally I will focus on a single poem, and, in keeping with the magazine’s remit, I will be featuring some lesser known poets alongside bigger names. My first column is on the theme of wanderers, and looks at some poems and songs from Ivor Gurney, some 10th century Anglo-Saxons, Wordsworth, a nameless cowboy, and the Korean poet Park Mog Wol.

The Wagon Magazine is a print publication, available by mail order. It’s always an intriguing read – please give it your consideration.

It archives old articles online. You can read my first effort here.

The editorial is here.

My fellow blogger and poet John Looker’s article is here.

And here is an example of some of the gems the magazine is capable of uncovering, a lovely selection of translated poems by the Kannada language poet, S. Manjunath, translated and with an introduction by Kamalakar Bhat.

 

 

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